Blog: Thoughts on Life and Painting

Controlled Chaos

…like riding the sled down the hill at Farmington, a big scary steep hill, and you can see the bonfire at the bottom, near the creek on the 18th fairway, steep and cold and going so fast on the shiny ice you could scream, except the sound would freeze even before it left your mouth.

Or racing into the woods, twigs slapping at your thighs, at your face, knowing you could trip at any moment and crash face-down into the brambles, or worse step in a gopher hole and twist your ankle but still you run dodging the saplings and jumping over the fallen trees headlong– mad but wildly exuberant.

Or painting a large one using up all the pthalo blue, knowing you don’t have the money to buy more anytime soon but what the hell, laying in the horizon in one swift stroke because it just looks so dashing, using the 2″ brush to make the clouds wispy, feathering feathering, slapping on the water with gobs of paint, rolling in the shadows in the foreground, over and over make it insistent and with the knife scraping the highlights out with no way to rework it if you make one false stroke.

Controlled chaos.

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Soothing the soul of others is a full time job for some artists.


Just think of that.

I have to admit, this is a new thought for me. But the reality is that all the hard work we artists put in…the hours of concept planning, sketching, color tests, practicing just the right strokes, inventing new marks, expanding the source imagery, putting layer after layer on the panel to get just the right tonal movement, and the many moments of just plain thinking about how to make art, produces something that will (hopefully) sooth the soul of someone who decides to live forever with some industrial grade paint smudged on a hunk of wood.

It is a humbling occupation in all ways.

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A way of explaining the world

Fragile Sea 2, 48×48, Acrylic Mixed Media

What science and art have in common is a way of explaining the world. These Fragile Earth paintings are my reaction to the times in which we find ourselves.

Artists, like poets, use visual lyricism to interpret what is happening to THEM, and thus everyone else TOGETHER. The collective US respond because we share this world. Each unique person, you, me, each sentient being, brings an individual viewpoint to the party and we make this concoction, this blossoming creation together. So therefore your response to this painting is a shared one, and that my friends, is the measure of the power of a work of art: the breadth and depth of experience that the work allows each of us to share –with everyone!

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Immediate Giftification

We now have e-gift cards!

Let’s face it. Art is VERY subjective. You wouldn’t presume to pick a lamp for someone, or their wallpaper. So giving the gift of art is always fraught with risk, no matter how sure you are that your favorite person will simply love it. So a gift card is the perfect way to say “Hey, I think you would enjoy a work of art, so pick what you would really like and enjoy it forever.”

NOW, IT’S EASY
With one or two clicks, get a beautiful E-Gift card to send to that special person…like the guy or gal who has everything, and how the heck are you going to find something truly unique??? We’ve got the answer.

An Aaron Bowles Art E-Gift Card

IMMEDIATE GIFTIFICATION
You can download a custom-designed gift card right from our website! This includes a beautiful PDF gift announcement. Several styles to choose from—contemporary to traditional. Simply print the colorful gift card and the email with the code we’ll send you, and you’ve got a ready-to-give, truly unique gift, that can magically turn into a work of art that will be long cherished.

 

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What is an abstract landscape?

Abstract representative improvisation, at the intersection of an arranged eloquence and expressionism, enables one to construct dream worlds that are self-aware, and conscious of the external cumulative influences of all the myriad artistic occurrences that precede and are concurrent with our present reality. This includes the use of internal dreams, landscapes, contemporary events, mythologies, and widely disparate textures and surfaces with which to depict our world’s collective visions.

ANTECENDENTS:

JMW Turner, Sunset At Turners Cove
Paul Cezanne, Mt. Saint Victoire
Georges Braque, Houses at L’Estaque
Andre L’Hote, Riverbank
Richard Diebenkorn, Ocean Park
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Unique marks

THE FRAGILE EARTH

This painting uses verticals and curves to indicate the forest against a backdrop of light shining through the trees. A great challenge in this series is to not render too much—to avoid being too fussy. That would detract from the abstraction sensibility. So the task is to find mark-making tools that will say something like “grasses” or “distant trees” without being too literal.

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The midtone challenge

THE FRAGILE SEA
Paintings that explore a vista of the sea.
These are interesting to do because I have to control the value (darkness and lightness) very carefully. The painting needs to be an overall midtone, so that the sun can shine against a darker background in order to get the effect of light, but not so dark as to be gloomy. And blending a naturalistic view with abstraction is always a challenge.

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This Fragile Earth

At this juncture in human history, a recognition of the overwhelming problem facing our species seems inevitable. Each of us has a personal connection with this Earth. She nourishes and sustains us, yet is dependent upon us for her caretaking. This work makes us aware of the beauty and fragility of our world. And provides inspiration for you to make a difference.

The techniques to express the complexity of this visual world evolved from an interest in impressionism, that eventually transitioned to modernism, and is now contemporary abstraction.

Abstract representative improvisation, a term at the intersection of an arranged eloquence and expressionism, enables us to construct dream worlds that are self-aware, and conscious of the external cumulative influences of all the myriad artistic occurrences that precede and are concurrent with our present reality. Our purview includes the use of internal dreams, landscapes, contemporary events, mythologies, and widely disparate textures and surfaces with which to depict our visions.

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